Register to answer and stay on top of the questions and answers. Sign up to receive the daily digest!
Keep Me Updated!

one moment please...


Welcome to AskAHumanist.com! Anyone can ask questions, but please only answer questions if you are a humanist. For an introduction to Humanism, visit http://americanhumanist.org/Humanism. This is a service provided by the American Humanist Association.

Enroll in the Online Course Positive Humanism: A Quick Guide to Living the Good, Secular Life

Q&A Home Contact Form



Send me a copy of this message
Send Message sending message...

Q&A Home Question

2

votes

image loading...
Raul Rubio

Seasoned Vet

image loading...

Raul Rubio


Seasoned Vet

About Raul Rubio

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
belief
fun
god
humanist
religion
Mon, Mar 02, 2015 - 01:38 PM

If God appeared on earth, would humanists then believe he exists?



46 Answers

0

votes

image loading...
Neil Stahl

Seasoned Vet

image loading...

Neil Stahl


Seasoned Vet

About Neil Stahl

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Tue, Jan 26, 2016 - 05:03 AM
Like others have said, there would need to be incredibly strong proof for such an incredible event. It would need to exhibit truly God-like powers, especially to prove it's not, say, a very technologically advanced alien. I have proposed that it should write a detailed message in the sky all over earth in All languages at the same instant telling us what it wants of us. Perhaps better would be to instantly clean our air and our water of all the pollutants we've put in them for the last two hundred years. It would have to be something everyone experiences, and long-lasting, but still we might wonder if we'd just gone insane and all that didn't really happen.

Ultimately you still would not be sure whether it's a real god or an extremely technologically advanced alien and you'd just have to hope it was benevolent. Far more benevolent than, e.g. a god that would burn people in terrible fire forever just because they didn't believe in it, when it wasn't making any effort to be believed in. A god like that would be deserving only of contempt.

6

votes
Answer Accepted!

image loading...
Jason Lenthe

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Jason Lenthe


Eager Newbie

About Jason Lenthe

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Mon, Mar 02, 2015 - 10:26 PM
I would gladly believe in the existence of anything for which there is solid verifiable evidence. That is why I believe in many counter-intuitive things for example that gravity bends space and time, that humans evolved from single celled organisms, that 0.999... equals 1, that space itself is expanding, and antropogenic global warming to name a few.

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Omnipotence, omniscience, omnibenevolence, and omnipresence is quite a tall order, so for me that would take much more than a mere appearance.

6

votes

image loading...
Craig Good

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Craig Good


Eager Newbie

About Craig Good

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Wed, Mar 04, 2015 - 01:09 AM
You appear to be confusing humanism with atheism. And also atheism with agnosticism. The agnostic recognizes that the question of whether or not gods exist is a meaningless one. It cannot be answered, because no evidence one way or another can ever be found. If your hypothetical god showed up, it would mean suddenly (for the first time in history) there would be direct evidence of a god. And since that god would be observable and testable, it could not possibly be any of the gods that have ever been imagined.

Most humanists probably are atheists, but it's not strictly necessary. And being an atheist doesn't make one a humanist.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

4

votes

image loading...
Chris Dunn

Seasoned Vet

image loading...

Chris Dunn


Seasoned Vet

About Chris Dunn

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Wed, Mar 04, 2015 - 10:39 AM
If he/she showed up, I wouldn't 'believe' in god, I'd 'know of' god.
This falls under the category of a loaded question--it doesn't seek an answer so much as imply something about the people being questioned. One may just as well ask, "If absolutely no evidence of a god existed anywhere on earth--if belief in a god went against all common sense and reason, would theists still believe?


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

3

votes

image loading...
Steffen Haugk

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Steffen Haugk


Eager Newbie

About Steffen Haugk

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Tue, Mar 03, 2015 - 06:43 AM
I can only speak for myself. Of course I would believe in a god if one could make itself known. I would in fact consider it quite important to know about it. If our world was ruled by a magician in the sky, then it would be helpful to understand what he wants from us.

However, I am not sure what that appearance could look like. We all know there are powerful illusions, and there are extraordinary magicians, there are powerful drugs and other things that can play tricks on the mind. I agree with Jason that it would take a bit more than an 'appearance' to convince me of the existence of a god, let alone of all the teachings and little details of how to please him. For example, if a big face appeared in the sky, would that really settle the question on transubstantiation? Or would that really tell us which positions it is ok to have sex in? Would that even tell us which god is the right one? Or if there are more gods in the sky?

Even if the appearance convinced me that something lives in the sky, it wouldn't tell me anything on how to live my life or if there was an afterlife or anything else really, apart from that there is a big face in the sky.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

3

votes

image loading...
Ann Lara

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Ann Lara


Eager Newbie

About Ann Lara

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:12 PM
Of course I would believe an undisputed god appearance, but really, what would it matter?


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

3

votes

image loading...
Dorothy McClester

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Dorothy McClester


Eager Newbie

About Dorothy McClester

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 05:47 PM
If I "knew" something, why would I have to "believe" it? The fallacy is in confusing knowledge with belief.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

2

votes

image loading...
Stacy S
Mr Stacy S

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Stacy S

Mr Stacy S

Eager Newbie

About Stacy S

Member of Canadian Armed Forces.
Member of Humanist Canada and Ontario Humanist Society.
Print Tue, Mar 03, 2015 - 07:38 AM
To me, the question suggests that Humanists reject God instead of disbelieve in God. I do not reject God because I have no convincing evidence of God's existence. Some (many?) theists say that deep down everybody believes in God and those who call themselves atheists are rejecting the existence of God. I do not buy into this because my lack of belief in God is not a wilful act of rebellion, it is a thought out act of examining the evidence (or lack of) and coming up with a conclusion. To assume I may continue to disbelieve when handed proof is counter to the ideals that Humanists typically hold. “Humanists advocate the use of the scientific method as a guide to distinguish fact from fiction” (2002 Amsterdam Declaration).

Although it may be difficult to accept, if God really appeared, of course I would believe in him/her/it.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

2

votes

image loading...
Ryan Lakanen

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Ryan Lakanen


Eager Newbie

About Ryan Lakanen

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:02 PM
"The foolish reject what they see; the wise reject what they think." --Taoist saying


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

2

votes

image loading...
Sarah Moore

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Sarah Moore


Eager Newbie

About Sarah Moore

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:09 PM
If God were to appear and could be proven to be God, I would believe. However, I don't know how we could ever prove that God is actually God. You'd have to come up with some measurable criteria that uniquely defines God, as opposed to some other kind of mystical being or an alien. None of the criteria that I've heard that would uniquely define God could be measured. Perform miracles? Well, an alien race with much better technology might be able to conjure food out of what appears to be thin air, or could heal a paralyzed person, or any number of other supposed miracles. How would you know the difference? I would believe in aliens before I believed in God- one is much more probable than the other.

And then there's the question of worship- even if you decided that this being was probably God, what then? Does the fact that a being is God (assuming we knew what that even meant- see the whole dilemma of measurable criteria above) mean anything to me? I don't know. I'm not inclined to worship anything, much less a being that, as far as I can tell, is either uninterested or unable to address the ignorance and suffering that goes on in his or her name. Certainly I would never worship the Christian god, or the Muslim god, or any other version of god that I've ever heard of. I might be inclined to develop some relationship to or with it, depending on why it was here and what it could teach about the universe, but I can't imagine worshiping it for any reason. What would be the point? Even assuming biblical heaven and hell were real- the last thing I'm going to want to do is worship a being that would relegate anyone to hell for any reason whatsoever. That's just not the way I roll.

So, even if this being showed up, and even if it could be proven somehow to be God and therefore I believed, I'm not sure what the point would be other than the opportunity to satisfy curiosity.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

2

votes

image loading...
Daniel Langdon

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Daniel Langdon


Eager Newbie

About Daniel Langdon

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:23 PM
He/She would have to prove they are in fact god. Then answer for all of the evil they allowed.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

2

votes

image loading...
Adrian Lehman-Sizemore

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Adrian Lehman-Sizemore


Eager Newbie

About Adrian Lehman-Sizemore

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 04:35 PM
i think i take a minor affront to the idea that a person, faced with actual evidence would deny it over belief...I mean who would do something like that?


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

2

votes

image loading...
Shannon Massman

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Shannon Massman


Eager Newbie

About Shannon Massman

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 06:26 PM
Others here have said that even if a god-like entity appears "it can't be proven", or "it doesn't matter". Most theists would grasp these replies as rejectionist, perhaps saying "That is why you cannot let God into your heart".

So I think it's important to explain more carefully.

No compelling evidence for any god currently exists, therefore every theology has been carefully constructed to not require evidence. This means there is no test for any god, regardless of whether or not that god is currently "present". This means there is no way to know if one has "appeared".

The wording of the question is very important. Although the person who presented the question is an atheist, when theists pose theistic questions they are often constructed specifically to sustain an irrefutable argument (religion) in this way.

If an entity appeared I would certainly "believe" in that entity, in much the same way I "believe" in this hat currently on my desk. A theist will say "But *my* entity is Wondrous!" If the entity that appeared was strange and wondrous in some way, I would express the same amazement I do at any new thing. Amazement is invariably followed by both curiosity and skepticism, then investigation, and finally integration into my understanding.

In summary, I would *love* to find something new and wondrous. Therefore, SCIENCE!


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

2

votes

image loading...
Sandi Morris

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Sandi Morris


Eager Newbie

About Sandi Morris

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Fri, Mar 06, 2015 - 11:50 AM
Whose god? Where would this being appear and to who? Would this being provide proof that he/she/it is "god" and that he/she/it is the only god there is? Would this being submit to scientific testing to determine his/her/its validity? I'm sure I would demand other conditions if this event allegedly actually occurred. Just as I would do if someone claimed to have invisible pink unicorns in their garden. So my answer is, without incontrovertible scientific proof, no, I would not acknowledge the existence of god.

1

votes

image loading...
Stephen Sywak

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Stephen Sywak


Eager Newbie

About Stephen Sywak

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 01:52 PM
But how would I know that this thing was God?

How would I be able to tell the difference between God-like powers, Godhead, and just a representative from an incredibly advanced civilization?

What if telepathy and telekinesis were supported by skill-sets or technologies with which I am simply not aware? What if this thing (creature, person, whatever) was merely a charlatan? What if it was pulling off a very well-orchestrated "magic show" for my behalf ("magic," in this case, being defined as sleight-of hand, trickery, and the like)?

Would there ever be sufficient criteria to make a determination that this thing claiming to be God is actually God?

Wasn't there a Star Trek™ movie based on this premise?



Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
Guest

Unregistered

Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:05 PM
The answer is: "it will never happen, It can't happen, it's impossible."


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
Paul Baldwin

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Paul Baldwin


Eager Newbie

About Paul Baldwin

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:32 PM
Of course.
But I must see him/her/it and this being MUST show me without any doubt that is indeed a god.
Then I'll have to talk seriously to this entity and he/she/it will have a lot to explain about his attitude and crimes against the Humanity.
But it's a impossible proposition,because there's not god.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
Kate Vaughn

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Kate Vaughn


Eager Newbie

About Kate Vaughn

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:42 PM
I've thought about this, and no, not at face value. I mean think about it-- If an alien force wanted to conquer us with no resistance what better way to do it than to pretend to be our god using some advanced technology? We've been beaming our radio/tv/satellite signals to space for decades. Any intelligence who could monitor it would know how to fool us. Again, what do we know? We know life exists in the universe because WE are life. We still have no such concrete evidence of supernatural deities.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
John Smith

Eager Newbie

image loading...

John Smith


Eager Newbie

About John Smith

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:51 PM
I can't speak for anyone else, but I'd like to think I'd analyze the evidence available to me and decide. So, sure. But then it would be part of the natural world, so wouldn't really be god anyway, no?


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
Amy E Hall
Living in the wilds

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Amy E Hall

Living in the wilds

Eager Newbie

About Amy E Hall

A freethinker, a world traveler, a pilot, and an artist.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 03:09 PM
Arthur C Clark famously said, "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic" I cannot tell you what it would take for me to believe the "evidence" presented. Since scientific understanding is on the decline, I have to think for the general populous, that evidence might be pretty sketchy. I am not calling all theists stupid, but a lack of science and critical thinking leads you to be possible victim of all kinds of fraud.
So again to the evidence. If there really is an all knowing god, then I have to assume that that god who knows and loves me would also know what it would take for me to fully believe and drop down on my knees. Since that has not come to pass, either he is a mean, conniving, vindictive child, or..he doesn't exist.

1

votes

image loading...
Murochi MacKay

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Murochi MacKay


Eager Newbie

About Murochi MacKay

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 03:46 PM
Clearly if the evidence was clear then any empiricist would have to accept it. Equally if the tooth fairy, Jupiter ,Odin or Santa appeared I would accept it but the chances of any of these entities appearing is vanishingly small. The question is a bit fatuous.

1

votes

image loading...
Mini Carlsson

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Mini Carlsson


Eager Newbie

About Mini Carlsson

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 04:55 PM
Being that there is no standard available to determine who and what god is, no.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
Brian Cooley

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Brian Cooley


Eager Newbie

About Brian Cooley

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 07:56 PM
Yes, but he or she would have much to answer.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
Richard Haven

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Richard Haven


Eager Newbie

About Richard Haven

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 10:12 PM
Sure

As long as the entity fit the definition of God.
Same for Allah, Mithra, and the Easter Bunny


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
KO
KO

Seasoned Vet

image loading...

KO

KO

Seasoned Vet

About KO

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Fri, Mar 06, 2015 - 09:20 AM
Hmm. How to answer the theist who poses this one. I'd start with a quick bit of background, then hit the question.

Quick background: I take the following to be the central principal of all rationality: that we all ought to believe in proportion to the evidence. I construe "evidence" broadly to include (1) induction, (2) deduction and (3) simple empirical verification. That means that I should proportion my belief in God's existence to the evidence at hand. Currently, all the (1) inductive proofs (e.g., the design and fine tuning arguments) fail quite miserably. All of the (2) deductive proofs of his existence (ontological proofs, etc.), that I've seen, are quite bad; some are clever in their subtlety, but all fail. Neither I nor anyone else has seen God (3). The mere existence of believers is no evidence God's real existence, as that would be either ad populum, or appeal to tradition fallacies. Thus, if I proportion my belief to the evidence, I don't believe God exists.

On to the question: The problem with the question, as posed, is the antecedent: "God appeared on earth". The person who asked you this question needs to tell us what that appearance is. Press him/her for more details: a face in the sky? A man in robes with bleeding palms? A dream or vision? What am I experiencing in the counter-factual thought experiment? Without more details, we cannot really answer.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
Andres Rolon

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Andres Rolon


Eager Newbie

About Andres Rolon

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Fri, Mar 06, 2015 - 12:56 PM
Yes, of course I'd believe in him. And not only that: I would demand him to respond and pay for all the crimes related to him. And I'd scold him for his tremendous moral ambiguity.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

1

votes

image loading...
Bill Haines
Garden State Attitude in the Old Dominion

Seasoned Vet

image loading...

Bill Haines

Garden State Attitude in the Old Dominion

Seasoned Vet

About Bill Haines

"Love well, seek the good in all things, harm no others, think for yourself, take responsibility, respect nature, do your utmost, be informed, be kind, be courageous: at least, sincerely try."
-- A. C. Grayling
Print Fri, Jul 10, 2015 - 01:24 PM
Assuming 'God appeared on earth' means 'some entity somehow demonstrated to the satisfaction of all that it was the creator of the universe', then yes, of course. But since that's even less likely than Cthulhu cruising into Los Angeles ridden by a resurrected H. P. Lovecraft screaming 'I told you so!', it's not really a serious question, is it. ;)

0

votes

image loading...
Neil Stahl

Seasoned Vet

Print Tue, Mar 03, 2015 - 02:11 PM
I am in strong agreement with some previous answers. If exceedingly strong evidence existed that one or more gods did after all exist, I could be convinced. But since this would be an astounding claim it would require astounding evidence. But this makes me technically an agnostic, which I sometimes acknowledge, but my disbelief in the existence of any god is strong enough that for practical purposes I'm an atheist.

Now let's talk briefly about what the ongoing absence of convincing evidence for a god means. Related to much of conventional Christianity or Islam it means their god would have to be incredibly immoral to consign people to eternal punishment for not believing something it could have provided convincing evidence for and didn't. So worship of such a god (unrelated to belief in it, given such strong evidence) would be at a minimum very distasteful; maybe impossible. Other versions of the Christian god and perhaps the Muslim god are said to be more forgiving so I might be able to worship one without a bad taste in my mouth.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Chuck O'Neil

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Chuck O'Neil


Eager Newbie

About Chuck O'Neil

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Wed, Mar 04, 2015 - 12:15 PM
How would anyone know if God appeared? Does God have a physical form? If so why hasn't God been seen before now? If no physical form how would I see him? Would God look like an existing living being? What if God is a bacterium, or a fish, bear, dinasour, bird or even a plant? How would we know it was God? Is there only one God? How would we know unless another God could confirm that there isn't? How would this God reconcile all the different concepts of him not only between religious but with in each religion? If there is verifable evidence that the apparition is God, and all thes questions could be verifably answered, then I would believe it.

0

votes

image loading...
Charles Brown
Fellow traveler

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Charles Brown

Fellow traveler

Eager Newbie

About Charles Brown

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:37 PM
If Harry Potter appeared on Earth, I would believe he existed. If Rumplestiltskin appeared on Earth I would believe he existed. If King Kong appeared on Earth I would believe he existed.
If God (whatever you mean by that) appeared on Earth I would believe he existed.
Any of these are just as likely to happen.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Guest

Unregistered

Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 04:12 PM
I would believe in what I saw, certainly. I would not be inclined to suddenly believe the whole religious construct however - any sufficiently advanced or powerful entity could and likely would be tempted to use the widespread belief in God for its own purposes. With popular appearances so wildly out of character for God in our history, I would be suspicious. Likewise, I would not be accepting the biblical account based on such an appearance, since the biblical account is clearly wrong on numerous points.

So I would be curious, I would pay close attention and be interested, but I would take a lot of convincing that whatever entity had appeared was related in any way to the God of the bible. If it was, I would be very curious as to how, and what the actual nature of this God was.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Robert Atallo

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Robert Atallo


Eager Newbie

About Robert Atallo

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 04:37 PM
I'd ask him to part the Red Sea. Then I'd ask which is the true religion. Then I'd ask how he'd reconcile all the omnis (omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent, etc.) with the world we actually see. If he did all or any of these, I'd know he was a fake.

0

votes

image loading...
Charles Martin

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Charles Martin


Eager Newbie

About Charles Martin

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 06:10 PM
I have read the answers given by others. They are all correct. God knows what it would take for each person to believe and give it the praise it requires.Given that None know that needed requirement, it must not be needed by this thing you ask about, god. If it did happen, this thing would not be the God you appear to reference, although it is impossible to know which god you are referring to. I hope itf it did happen, it would be Thor, and he could end this silliness of a girl playing him. Nergal would be fun too, as he would give hope to all humans, as he was once one of us.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Sue Parry

Seasoned Vet

image loading...

Sue Parry


Seasoned Vet

About Sue Parry

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Fri, Mar 06, 2015 - 01:17 AM
What would count as evidence that this being who showed up was, in fact, a god? Many people have claimed to be gods , but we discount them. How are they different from any other being who claimed to be a god? I think if we remember that gods are products of the human imagination, the question evaporates.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Mini Carlsson

Eager Newbie

Print Sat, Mar 07, 2015 - 10:33 AM
Being that there is no standard to qualify who or what god is, no.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
R Lee

Eager Newbie

image loading...

R Lee


Eager Newbie

About R Lee

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Sat, Mar 07, 2015 - 12:14 PM
I guess that would depend upon how she appeared and how she proved she was a "god."
I think we need to stop assuming that if there is a god it has male genitalia.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
R Lee

Eager Newbie

Print Sat, Mar 07, 2015 - 12:17 PM
I guess that would depend upon how she appeared and how she proved she was a "god."
I think we need to stop assuming that if there is a god it has male genitalia.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Ronnie Kramer

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Ronnie Kramer


Eager Newbie

About Ronnie Kramer

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Sun, Mar 08, 2015 - 12:41 AM
LOL so you have received varied answers to this question and had to clarify and restate.


If I see a thing, the thing is either;
1) a natural phenomena reflecting light which is perceived by a neurophysiological pathway which has been well described by science; or
2) a mental manifestation, (I can not discount the possibility that a supernatural entity affects the mind, but neither can I discount the possibility that I have an imagination.).

Therefore any appearance must be a natural phenomena, either physical or purely mental. In any case, it is impossible to perceive a god, defined in terms of super-nature, as distinct from from neural anomaly.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Kevin McCarthy

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Kevin McCarthy


Eager Newbie

About Kevin McCarthy

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Mon, Mar 09, 2015 - 08:44 AM
Probably. The standard of evidence would have to be quite high with all the con-artists out there.

If it's the god of the Bible or the Koran or any of the Greek, Norse, or similar gods... still wouldn't worship it though.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Oscar Gonzalez

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Oscar Gonzalez


Eager Newbie

About Oscar Gonzalez

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Mon, Jan 25, 2016 - 07:12 PM
I don't know how to use natural means to prove the supernatural. I'd have to use supernatural tools to achieve that and, at the point, the issue is moot.

But if God somehow appeared to me in a manner to help me believe that He was indeed God, then I'd want to have a long sit-down to see if He'd be open to some helpful corrections on how He runs things. Clearly, being God only gets Him so far with me. He still would have to prove that He's perfect.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

-1

votes

image loading...
Bruce Larson

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Bruce Larson


Eager Newbie

About Bruce Larson

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 02:54 PM
The question is logical fallacy. It uses circular reasoning... It is in fact complete nonsense.

Circular reasoning (Latin: circulus in probando, "circle in proving"; also known as circular logic) is a logical fallacy in which the reasoner begins with what they are trying to end with.

-1

votes

image loading...
Charlotte Henry

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Charlotte Henry


Eager Newbie

About Charlotte Henry

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Fri, Mar 06, 2015 - 08:44 AM
To nitpick semantics, "If God showed up on earth" then humanists would not believe, they would know. You guys need to be honest, which you frequently find very difficult. Belief and faith are not the same thing as knowledge. You can believe that witches exist, but you can't produce one who is capable of performing a documentable supernatural act of witchery. If you could produce such a witch then we would "know" of witchcraft and witches rather than believe in them. I'm going to step out on a limb here and assume you are christian. You have a book, and in your book you read the claim that the book is true. The Muslims also have a book and within their book they read the claim that their book is true and their book is incompatible with your book. Their book says you are going to hell because Jesus was not divine and that Mohammed is the one true prophet. Your book says that Jesus is the only path to salvation and escape from eternal torment in hell and muslims reject Jesus as the divine son of god. This one thing is certain, at least one side is wrong. The greatest probability is that both are wrong because there is no proof that the books are what they say they are other than the books themselves claiming inerrancy. This is a "because I said so." validation. The Mormons have their own book with a "because I said so" claim and the Scientologists have their own book with "because I said so." You can believe that vaccines cause autism, but literally thousands of research studies fail to verify that belief. Scientists and rational people conclude that there is no reason to BELIEVE that vaccines cause autism, or that an anti vaxer's claims have enough merit to be worth accepting. No matter how sincere the anti vaxer is, their views should NOT be used as a foundation for creating laws that affect the rest of society. And speaking of "Gods" laws, are you aware that after Moses supposedly smashed the original 10 commandments tablets that the perfect creator of the universe said he would make Moses another copy and that it would be identical? Exodus 34: 11-28. Now, ask yourself a couple of questions; 1. Is god perfect if he can't remember what he wrote on the first tablets? These ten things had to be the most important things in the world on the mind of the perfect creator of the universe, because he is going to write them down himself, so this has to be some pretty big stuff. Is the perfect creator of the universe really that concerned about how you cook a goat? Did you read this far and not feel resistance to everything i have written? Of course you did. It is called cognitive dissonance and your next impulse is to either totally dismiss me or result to something called motivated reasoning.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

-2

votes

image loading...
Ken Martin

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Ken Martin


Eager Newbie

About Ken Martin

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 03:16 PM
Illogical. This question assumes the existence of god. Subsequently, this is not a valid question.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

-3

votes

image loading...
M. Rachel Jones

Eager Newbie

image loading...

M. Rachel Jones


Eager Newbie

About M. Rachel Jones

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Thu, Mar 05, 2015 - 03:49 PM
She's all around you. If there is a 'creator' or 'divine presence', it certainly isn't the Abrahamic god. The Mulitverse may be one living consciousness.
Anything less would be meaningless.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

-3

votes

image loading...
Mike Zelvin

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Mike Zelvin


Eager Newbie

About Mike Zelvin

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Fri, Mar 06, 2015 - 02:51 PM
What a dumb question. If a slab of goo appeared on Earth and took away your power to think, would the slab of goo exist- because I just said so? What if god came down and said Raul Rubio is a d-bag who should be paid no mind? Would God then disappear? If a walking whale vagina appeared and destroyed the laws of physics, would it matter that she would then qualify as "god"- since the Universe would cease to exist? What if a being came to Earth with no power other than to explain every question we can possibly ask, forever, scientifically?

Where is the intelligence to even post such question as if it has merit over an infinite number of similarly nonsensical questions? Where is the respect for logic? Why not instead pose the math solution which proves such questions to be like dividing by zero?

(Don't ask me, I'm rusty. Or lazy. Regardless, it can intuitively be done.)

Such dumb deserves math application, so as to eliminate or be used to eliminate all future nonsensical questions.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

Registered User Comments

Gary Rinker
Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 10:56:04 PM
@Jason Lenthe:
I am open to the unlikely possibility that the universe has a creator. Although the appearance of such a being and demonstration of power could cause me to believe, I would still have too many questions to accept the creator as being worthy of my allegiance.

login to reply
0 replies
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...

Raul Rubio
Thursday, March 05, 2015 - 03:07:04 PM
I should have clarified the question and provided the context. Some of the responses I have received (privately and mostly anonymously) have had me laughing.

An extremely devout religious person asked me this question a few days before I posted. We got into a discussion about it and I hit many of these points in that conversation. The question seemed like a common enough question that I thought I would post it.

Thank you.

login to reply
3 replies
3 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...
 

KO
Friday, March 06, 2015 - 09:38:26 AM
And it's a really good thing to post, too. Theists ask this. In fact Peter Boghossian, in his Manual for Creating Atheists, suggests that we might be able to rate the strength of our certainty in a belief in terms of whether we would accept evidence against it. 10 being so certain that I'd not accept any evidence. Clearly 10 = faith. 1 being so uncertain that even a little evidence would change my mind. Certainly, if my atheism is be rational, I would have to think about WHAT evidence I would accept to change my mind!

It's always great to know what would count as evidence against our own position... frankly, not doing that might be belief bias.

login to reply
 
1 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...
 

Chris Dunn
Friday, March 06, 2015 - 11:32:49 PM
I enjoy these kinds of questions because they invite discussion on the assumptions brought about by each belief system. The idea of believing in god when he's standing in front of you is a paradox. And faith could not exist under that circumstance--proof destroys faith. But the other side of the question is Reality (with the big R)--if the question were "If God appeared before me, would I then admit he is real?" then my answer would be a simple yes--assuming a lot of details about him/her/it 'really being god', of course. But the faithful believe God to be real--and that's where the trouble comes up--if faith dictates our reality, it will differ with the reality of one without faith. This is what makes pluralism so difficult to practice.

login to reply
 
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...
 

Stacy S
Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 08:14:00 AM
Personally, I like the question as it is. Presenting a simple question without any background prompts people to respond with their first instinct. It can also give a idea about the personality of the respondent by how much they read into the question.

login to reply
 
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...

Lori Wood
Friday, March 06, 2015 - 04:48:57 PM
Now that the problems with the question have been addressed, just for fun, these are a few proofs I would require of the Biblical god:
Create, observably, another universe in six days, when and where Stephen Hawking and Neal Degrasse Tyson tell you to. This time around, make a better Earth, one without tectonic plates and germs. Instead of resting on the seventh day, give us scientific cures and preventions for diseases, birth defects, and injuries. Tell us, for the love of god, how to regrow human limbs like you so mercifully do for the salamanders. We do not want you to mysteriously do these things for us. We would rather do them ourselves. Resurrect Christopher Hitchens and have a live chat with him, Sam Harris and, Richard Dawkins for all to hear. Tell the believers that you are not worthy of praise and worship and to leave us alone. And thanks for the apples!

login to reply
0 replies
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...

Raul Rubio
Friday, March 06, 2015 - 04:31:14 PM
@Mike Zelvin: Nice. I think I cleared up my point in the comment section below.

login to reply
0 replies
1 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...

Lori Wood
Friday, March 06, 2015 - 04:26:40 PM
@M. Rachel Jones:

login to reply
0 replies
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...

William Adams
Friday, March 06, 2015 - 12:41:19 PM
I think the question is unanswerable in terms of yes, humanists would believe, or no, they would not. For one thing I cannot answer for other humanists. For myself, I have to answer with another question. That would be, if God appeared as what? God is not part of nature but the creator of it, according to faith, so how does God appear within nature if he's not a part of it? As a bush that's caught fire? As a man? The sun? A great catastrophe from the sky? If he appeared as he is it would then be the same old story. He would appear as remote, invisible and untestable. So my answer is no I would not believe. If he appeared as something I could perceive then I would think it was just another artifact of nature and not its progenitor. If he appeared as he is then I would not notice.

login to reply
0 replies
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...

Robert Atallo
Thursday, March 05, 2015 - 04:43:24 PM
@M. Rachel Jones: Yeah, but if everything is God, then nothing is God.

login to reply
0 replies
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...

former student
Thursday, March 05, 2015 - 02:05:41 PM
This is such a hypothetical question - having been a non-believer all my life... and have this question asked, it's like if someone ask me: "If you wake me one day and could be immortal, would you accept?" That's why the answer is: "it will never happen, It can't happen, it's impossible." It's like asking someone to touch their own ears with their tongue: IMPOSSIBLE. Why would I answered something that is purely impossible. God was created by humans who didn't know where the sun was going at night; they didn't know why the wind was blowing, they didn't know why the moon was round, then a few days later shaped like a crescent...

login to reply
0 replies
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...

Sue Parry
Thursday, March 05, 2015 - 08:45:19 AM
@Craig Good: How would you test whether this being that claimed/appeared to be a god actually was one? People have showed up claiming to be gods many times, but that doesn't mean we have any way to test whether their claims are true. I'd venture to say that part of the very definition of a god is that there is no way to test his/her/its reality.

login to reply
0 replies
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...



About Archieboy Holdings, LLC. Privacy Policy Contact
 Website Design and Software Copyright 2017, Archieboy Holdings, LLC.